Simple Guide to Sourdough

A SIMPLE GUIDE FOR SOURDOUGH BEGINNERS

Is sourdough really worth all the hype? UM YES.

Post COVID, the whole world seemed embezzled by the craze of sourdough baking. And boy, am I on the train too. It is a fun bandwagon to be on & I would love to invite you to hop aboard. The beauty of sourdough is that it is fun to provide our families with good bread & treats. Additionally, it is a great prebiotic to have in our diets. Lastly, it makes wonderful gifts to give to others with the starter itself & baked goodies to share with others. Are you convinced yet?

If you are nervous or intimated by the information overload… I got you. This is a simple guide to help you get started and build your confidence. When I first started entertaining the idea of having sourdough, I was bombarded by the overload of instructions, recipes, what to dos & what not to dos. I hope as you read this, you will be guided gently on where to go & how to start. This is a very generic beginner’s guide… this is designed to help shine some light on your newest journey of sourdough!

***Note: I am not an expert. This is only the bare building blocks to sourdough. I just want to help you get started on getting started on sourdough!

I will lead you to other blogs that are full of information, science, and a wealth of wisdom to help you. This guide is solely to help you grasp the simple concept of sourdough starter. The purpose of this guide is to help lead you to start & not overwhelm you. My hope is that this will simplify the idea of sourdough and make you truly excited & confident to want to begin***

Click Here to Check Out My Free Sourdough Guide Printable!

To the beginning of your sourdough journey!!

Sourdough Starter

To start this whole thing, we need to find you a starter! There are a few ways to do so:

The easiest way is to find a friend, neighbor, family member, etc to lend you a small dosage of their sourdough starter. You can immediately start feeding the starter & start researching recipes.

If you are needing to start completely from scratch— check out The Clever Carrot Sourdough Starter. This is a 7-10 day process. The bonus to this is that you will learn how to start sourdough starter from scratch and how it works from the very beginning.

The last option is you can order dehydrated sourdough & start from there— check out Ballerina Farm. When you order packaged dehydrated sourdough, there will be steps that should come with it to help you rehydrate the starter!

Once you have your starter in hand, name that precious thing. It is living & vibing— and she will be a beautiful addition to your family (& an extra chore, but its really simple & fulfilling ;))

NEXT, Supplies.

All Purpose Flour (Costco)

Water

Weck Jars (Home for Sourdough) (You will want two)

Mason Jars (Cheaper Option Instead of Weck Jars) (You will want two)

Food Scale (Most Recipes Measure in Grams– need accuracy in sourdough!)

Bread Scorer (For Design & Baking)

Stirring Stick (For Daily Feedings)

Danish Whisk (Helps With Mixing Dough)

A Large Dutch Oven To Bake Sourdough Bread; Sourdough Starter to the Right of It!

WHEN TO FEED SOURDOUGH

You will need to feed starter daily if left out on the kitchen counter. If you are out of town or want to take a break, place starter in the refrigerator. In the fridge, starter will only need to be fed once a week.

Sourdough Dough Starter when “fed.” It gets all bubbly & active a few hours after being fed. This is what makes the bread or other recipes rise & “sour”.

HOW TO FEED

Feed your starter daily. Use a scale for accuracy– it is crucial! Remove 60 grams (sourdough discard) from your starter. Put in 60 grams of flour and 60 grams of water. Stir it all together with your stir stick or fork.

After feeding, wait a few hours until the sourdough starter gets bubbly. When it is bubbly, it is becoming ready to use. If you want to really make sure your starter is ready, perform a float test. Take a small dollop of starter into a glass full of water. If the starter “floats” and rises to the top of the water, your starter is READY! If it sinks, it is not activated or “bubbly” enough. So wait until it passes the float test to begin any recipes.

ACTIVE VS DISCARD

Sourdough discard is the sourdough you take out of the starter jar when you feed it. You will place this discard into another jar. Hence, why the supplies list recommends 2 of each. One for active. One for discard.

Active sourdough is the jar that gets fed the water and flour daily. Active sourdough will be the “bubbly” or “webbing” of the starter. This is what makes the dough rise up like yeast.

Pay attention to recipes— some will specifically call for active or discard sourdough!

ACTIVE is on the left, DISCARD is on the right

THE BEST SIMPLE “ACTIVE” BEGINNER SOURDOUGH RECIPES

SAME DAY SOURDOUGH BREAD BY FARMHOUSE ON BOONE

SOURDOUGH SANDWICH BREAD BY FARMHOUSE ON BOONE

SOURDOUGH CINNAMON BREAD BY THE HOMEMADE HARVEST

HOMEMADE SOURDOUGH BAGELS BY FARMHOUSE ON BOONE

SOURDOUGH PIZZA DOUGH BY FARMHOUSE ON BOONE

THE BEST SIMPLE “DISCARD” BEGINNER SOURDOUGH RECIPES

SOURDOUGH DISCARD BANANA BREAD BY DIRT & DOUGH

SOURDOUGH DISCARD TORTILLAS BY THE SIMPLE HOMEPLACE

SOURDOUGH DISCARD DOUGHNUT HOLES BY ABOUT DINNER THYME

SOURDOUGH DISCARD MAPLE PECAN COOKIES BY FORAGERS OF HAPPINESS

SOURDOUGH DISCARD BLONDIES BY LYNN‘S WAY OF LIFE

SOURDOUGH DISCARD PANCAKES BY THE ROOTED FARMHOUSE

With all my love,

Haley

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